Easy Steps to Get Boston Moving Permits

Bostonians lose a total of 76 hours annually while sitting in traffic, according to The Boston Globe. So, if you’re planning to move to Boston, you will definitely need a Boston Moving Permit.

Take a look at downtown Boston, back in 1949 when life was a lot simpler. There were barely any vehicles on the road back in those days. In modern times, just parking a moving truck can be like a never-ending maze with Boston’s narrow, winding streets.

Obviously, every neighborhood is different. If you’re moving around the Hyde Park, West Roxbury, or Roslindale area, you’ll find there’s more flexibility. Residences are more spread out compared to other areas. So, you can take your chances with parking your vehicle in the exact space you plan to park your truck.

However, if you’re moving to Charlestown, Back Bay, South End, North End, Jamaica Plain, or any other location in the Boston area, you probably don’t want to be so casual.

Double parking is out of the question. It’s not only rude, but it is also a safety hazard if an emergency vehicle needs to pass, and the driver is nowhere near the truck. Plus, you’ll more than likely be ticketed heavily.

You’ll need to be as close as possible to load (or unload) your belongings—whether you’re handling your move yourself or hire one of the Boston moving companies. The amount of space between the truck and the building (or the house) may not seem like a long distance. If you have furniture and many moving boxes, those extra steps will not only sap your energy but also cause labor and time costs to increase. You’re also increasing the chances of someone being injured.

BOSTON MOVERS RESIDENTIAL PARKING BOSTON

For this reason, the city of Boston has rectified this common problem by allowing drivers to reserve a parking spot for their moving day. Just like other affordable moving companies in NYC that consider this, we make the necessary reservations without raising our costs. With our professional staff on your side, you can rest assured that your relocation will go as smoothly as possible. We are always ready to go the extra mile to help you start the new chapter of your life at the new place as soon as possible.

Need a Moving Parking Permit? Take 5 Simple Steps to Get It!

Obtain your permit with little to no effort by following a number of steps listed below. All you need to do is develop a strategic approach and be diligent in sticking to your plans.

Step 1. Getting Boston Moving Permits at the Boston City Hall

Getting a moving parking permit is a lot easier than you think. All you need to do is pay a visit to City Hall (or apply online). Keep in mind that there are certain criteria you will need to meet, which is explained in more detail below. The next step is to wait for the signs to arrive in the mail. Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Parking Meters

You will need to block off parking meters and estimate the actual number you’ll need. For example, for a single truck, you will need two meters. Simply ask the office clerk for help if you feel uncertain.

  • Pricing

The total cost for one spot for a single moving truck is currently $69 for the permits.  Add an additional $20 per meter if you plan to block off any meters. For in-person payments for Boston Moving Permits, the City of Boston accepts Visa, MasterCard, personal checks, or cash.

  • Time Frame

Obtain your moving permits well in advance. Reserve your permits at least 2 DAYS  before your move if you reside in a metered area.

To reserve a spot for a truck in a residential area, consider obtaining your permits 3 DAYS in advance before your actual move. For instance, if you plan to move on Saturday, you should get your permits by the previous Wednesday.

One thing to keep in mind is that the process could be immediate or take a few hours. Be prepared! Consider setting aside adequate time – like a full day – you never know what kinds of things City Hall might have to deal with when waiting for permits.

  • Exceptions

Rules vary if you live on a state-owned road. Boston Moving Permits do not apply to your address if you reside near Boylston St., Charlesgate East and West, Park Drive, Fenway, and Riverway, and Jamaicaway. You fall under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Department of Recreation & Conservation, rather than the City of Boston. In this case, apply directly to the DCR for your moving permit.

STEP 2: Get Your Permit!

Obtaining Boston moving permits is easier than you think. You will want to apply online to have the permits mailed to you. To apply, you must meet ALL of the following guidelines:

  • Post all signs in an authorized spot. Avoid posting in no parking zones, bus stops, and handicapped spaces.
  • You may post your signs 2 Days (48 hours) prior to your moving day.  So, if your move is at 9:00 a.m. on the 27th, all signs should be before 9:00 a.m. on the 25th.
  • Your move is for 2 Weeks after the date you applied and no more 1 month after the date you applied for the permit. You can only apply online if your moving date is between 14 and 28 days away.
  • You’re not moving from or to the North End during June, July, or August. If you plan to move during this time frame, you will need to find a parking space that will not collide with any parades, feasts, or other special events. Call Patricia Papa, Special Events Liaison at (617) 828-2509 for further details.
  • You’re looking for a single-day moving permit (7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) for the size of two parking spaces (forty feet).  If you need your permits to be valid from 12:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., you will have to make your request in person.

If you prefer getting things done all in one day instead of online, you can get your Boston Moving Permits in person downtown. The signage is currently $4.00 each,  plus a $61.00 base fee for the 40-foot area you will need to reserve for your truck.

Keep in mind, if you plan to reserve a space in front of a parking meter, there is an additional cost of $20.00 per meter head (within the 40-foot space).

Please note, if you are moving on a Sunday, the meter fees will be waived – possibly for evening moves, when the meters may be off. You might want to ask the clerk just to double-check.  

You will also be provided with flyers to distribute on your neighbors’ vehicles before the move to inform them about the upcoming parking arrangements.

Arriving at City Hall

When you arrive at City Hall, you will be required to pass security screening, which entails walking through metal detectors. Then you will be asked to place your wallet, keys, and phone onto a conveyor belt.

Thankfully, security screening is fast, so you should never see any long lines.

Once inside, walk past the coffee shop and go down the escalator to the mezzanine. Treat yourself to a cup of coffee as a little celebration after getting your permits.

Then take another escalator down to the 2nd floor. There, you’ll find a maze of windows — city assessor, elderly commission, birth certificates, and more.

You will find moving windows on the opposite end of the escalator. Make a left and find windows 2-6. One of them will have a light on, which means they are open.

STEP 3: Post Your Permit!

You will be required to post your Boston Moving Permits and “No Parking” signs for 48 HOURS (24 hours in a metered location) prior to your moving day. You can post them on parking meters, utility poles, trees, or fences within the 40-foot reserved location.

For some people, two signs aren’t visible enough. In this case, you can create additional “NO PARKING” signs out of cardboard. People should get the hint.

Just make sure the signs you create include the permit date. Make sure your signs are well secure and weatherproofed to withstand any weather conditions. You’ll want to ‘neighbor proof’ them as well!

Remember, you paid for your permits. They didn’t come free. This is your paid-for right to park on your moving day. Moving is stressful by itself. So, you don’t have to deal with annoying people’s problems.

You might want to distribute the flyers on the day of your move for your neighbors as a reminder. Place them firmly in the windshield wipers. Hopefully, you made copies. And if it’s raining or snowing, place your flyers into plastic binder sheets.

The city requires movers to post flyers at least once a day, 2 days prior to your move. Feel free to post them within a 20-foot radius of your moving spot (anywhere on any car).

You might want to post them more than just once if you’re located in a busy area. People need to respect the fact that you reserved a ‘legal’ spot. In the worst-case scenario, if they don’t want to move their vehicles out of your ‘No Parking’ zone, a tow truck guy will be more than happy to move it for them.

To avoid conflicts with your neighbors, you’ll want to make it clear, in advance, that they cannot park in your space under any circumstances. The same rule applies to the people moving from Boston to Chicago. 48-Hours gives people plenty of time—plenty of warning!

STEP 4: Hooray, it’s the Moving Day!

Did you hire a Boston moving company? Remember to check your reserved parking space at least 2 hours prior to their scheduled arrival. You might want to place large orange cones in your spaces with a flyer attached to each cone.

If a person is bold enough to park in your space anyway, call the Boston Police Department at 617-343-4911 (non-emergency line). Explain to them that there’s a car parked in your ‘paid for space’. Provide them with the person’s license plate number. The police will try to contact the owner.

This is a lot less salty than having your neighbor’s car towed. Unfortunately, if the police cannot reach the owner, you may have no other choice than to proceed with calling the local towing company. The key is to plan ahead so you can have a successful moving day.

STEP 5: Clean up!

Finally, when your belongings have been unloaded from the truck, it’s time to clean up. Remember to remove all of the signs and flyers. Place back any cones, traffic signs, or any city property that you used during the move. Make sure to report any damage to city property to the Public Works Department. This is how Boston Moving Permits work.

Does This Seem Too Complicated?

If this process is overbearing to handle, address our Boston to NYC moving company so that we can help you out. We’ll take care of all the permits for you prior to your move. 

The total cost is $250 per permit. Fees include obtaining the permits, posting the permits, and removal.

Please note, our fees do not cover calling the police or towing. If interested, please allow 2 weeks prior to your moving day.

Need more in-depth details? Apply Online for Boston Moving Permits here.

For questions regarding traffic approval, parking meters, signage or scheduling, contact the Boston Transportation Department at 617-635-4675 or 617-635-4680.

For questions about moving permits and fees, contact Boston Public Works Department at 617-635-4909 or 617-635-4910.